Writing A Problem Solution Essay: 5 Mistakes To Avoid

There are so many different parts to writing any kind of essay, but especially one about problems and solutions, that it’s hard to organize them all. You should find out ahead of time what mistakes you need to avoid so that you don’t fall into a trap you could have seen coming. Keep reading if you want to know things that you shouldn’t do, things that will make your life easier if they don’t happen.

Choosing a topic is one of those things that students tend to dislike about essay writing. It’s hard to find one that inspires you but also follows the guidelines your professor has set out for this assignment. But doing some internet research should find you plenty of ideas, and once you do have a great topic to write about, you can start using the tips below to avoid the common mistakes of paper writing about problems and solutions.

Five mistakes to avoid in problem solution essay writing

  • Formatting: it might not seem that important if you don’t follow the rules of 1” margins or double spacing, but it counts for more than you know. There are marks given for following the format guidelines, because that’s how life is—whatever job you get at the end of your education will have strict rules about how paperwork is to be created and formatted, so you might as well start learning that now.
  • Spelling and grammar: it probably goes without saying, but spellcheck your work before handing it in. Even better—have a friend who loves to read take a look at your homework and read it for spelling mistakes, because the computer won’t catch everything.
  • Not having a clearly separated introduction and conclusion—it’s necessary to have these for the structure of your arguments in the essay. The reader won’t be sure what they’re reading without being introduced to the problem at hand, just as they won’t be able to take action or feel a sense of finality without a conclusion.
  • Using too much information: this is a problem most students won’t have, but do make sure you’re only a few using strong citations and sources, not too many weaker ones.
  • Inappropriate language: this doesn’t just include clichés but also technical jargon, too strong or emotional words, or blind references without a source citation.