Corporate Social Responsibility

Corporate social responsibility is an essential aspect integrated in many businesses. Corporate social responsibility may be abbreviated and given other terminology or referred to as “responsible business” often. What makes corporate social responsibility (CSR) so intrinsic in business is in the function of the initiative placed. CSR essentially is a business’ action taken to accept any and all liabilities it may encounter, usually environmentally or socially.

Corporate Social Responsibility Applied:

To many, legal and business jargon is difficult to understand initially, but CSR is a business’ decision to incorporate a sense of consciousness through different avenues and apply it in order to maintain the respect, relationships, and businesses of others. Following are examples of businesses and their applications of corporate social responsibility.

  • Google
  • Google is a worldwide known search engine used by many people on the internet. The company itself has made many attempts to promote social good and proper citizenship to people. An example of this is Google Green. Google Green is the company’s venture to promote going ‘green’ and being environmentally friendly. Not only has this effort lowered the company’s costs overall, but also has promoted a decrease in energy requirements.

  • Ben & Jerry’s
  • Ben & Jerry’s is a famously popular sweet treat brand which sells ice-cream in a variation of flavors. Spite having a variation of products which appeal to all difference taste palate, the Vermont based company has stretched out efforts to apply CSR through several different ways. The company employs philanthropy by donating increments of their pre-tax profits to different causes, while also employing the use of fair trade ingredients in their products. They also have a Grassroots program which seeks to take action on and discuss a multitude of environmental and social issues.

  • Xerox
  • Xerox is a vastly large and powerful business, and alike the other previously mentioned businesses, it does often use its power for good. Xerox has a program which promotes community involvement, and asks for participation from employees directly. Over half a million of Xerox employees have been involved with the program, in fact. Xerox is not limited to just volunteer activities for employees, but also seeks to have a positive impact in affairs related to education, culture, and the sciences.

Regardless of the implementations, it’s difficult to argue that corporate social responsibility does more bad than it does good. CSR not only aids the business in maintaining a sense of morality and ethics, but it also aids the good of the community or those involved.